When to Give Up on a Book

When to Give Up on a Book

When to give up on a book (or if giving up on a book should even be considered an option) has been a topic that I have gone back and forth about quite a bit. When you go to college to study Literature, you don’t get much of a choice about what you read. Sure, you pick the classes, but the piles of books that come with each class are, for the most part, up to the professor to select.…

Book Review: Snow Hunters by Paul Yoon

Book Review: Snow Hunters by Paul Yoon

Snow Hunters tells the story of Yohan, a young North Korean man captured by the Americans in the Korean War. At the “end” of the Korean War, he is given the chance to be repatriated to North Korea, but he chooses to defect instead. Yohan finds himself in Brazil as the result of a refugee placement program, trying to grapple with his past and find his way in a completely new world. One of the major themes in the novel…

Going Further: The Catcher in the Rye

Going Further: The Catcher in the Rye

I love whenever I come across a visual that brings a book I’ve read to life. After reviewing The Catcher in the Rye, I was happy to come across some related content. I found an interactive map of New York City created by the New York Times that shows the places Holden visited. Anyone not familiar with the Big Apple might not realize just where Holden ended up. Considering Holden Caulfield was only running around New York for a few…

Reading Can Be Exhausting

Reading Can Be Exhausting

I took a class in college called “Readers, Writers, and Books”, mainly because my favorite professor was teaching it and partly because I thought it sounded straightforward enough. As a Literature major, I had been taking handfuls of intensive theory classes. I was hoping for a bit of an easier time. Of course, I should have known better than to judge a class by its title. I’ll spare you the nitty gritty, but the primary goal of the class was…

Haruki Murakami Bingo

Haruki Murakami Bingo

I came across this neat graphic from the New York Times and love how it (quite literally) illustrates the common themes that run throughout Haruki Murakami’s books. I’ve read everything Murakami has written that has been translated into English and can vouch that these are rather spot on. The vanishing cats are a bit redundant since there’s already a space for Something Vanishing. But lots of things and people end up missing in Murakami fiction. Perhaps that warrants the extra…